workholding table

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noplacetosail
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workholding table

Post by noplacetosail » Wed Mar 09, 2011 9:20 pm

I am wondering what you all use to hold work on your grinder table when grinding/finishing etc... I have a metal table and use a cam magnet under to hold material, its cool but slow. Anyone have a better idea? :idea:

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AnotherDano
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Re: workholding table

Post by AnotherDano » Wed Mar 09, 2011 11:57 pm

I've made improvements since this first 'proof of concept'.
But it works very well.

woodcrafters or just about any woodworking store should have these.
http://www.woodcraft.com/Category/10020 ... lamps.aspx

Note; For some reason, only one size/style is showing on this link page. They have a dozen or so IRL.

IMG_0139.JPG

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Re: workholding table

Post by WSS » Thu Mar 10, 2011 2:38 am

Oh ya, clever!!!

That will keep things from spinning around the shop, probably save on flap disks too.

Checkout these:

http://www.destaco.com/products.asp?loc ... cts=Clamps

I use them for hand working knife parts, frees up the hands. Good for small parts on the mill too.

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Last edited by WSS on Sat Mar 12, 2011 12:13 am, edited 1 time in total.

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AnotherDano
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Re: workholding table

Post by AnotherDano » Thu Mar 10, 2011 9:46 am

When I have a large run of the same part, I will cut out a reverse image with enough material around it to clamp down. With this template clamped down, all I have to do is drop the part into the template and go at it. The piece is held in place by the 'frame' and eliminates the unclamping, spinning around and reclamping.

That method also reduces the edge wear-down, as the flap disk is moving along a flat surface (part to template) and prevents the abrasive disk from gouging the sides of the piece. It's like using the forms of a concrete pour as a guide for the screed.
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pony
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Re: workholding table

Post by pony » Thu Mar 10, 2011 9:48 am

Thats a great idea. Thanks for sharing.
AnotherDano wrote:When I have a large run of the same part, I will cut out a reverse image with enough material around it to clamp down....

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Re: workholding table

Post by AnotherDano » Thu Mar 10, 2011 10:00 am

I'm still toying with the idea of using a drum sander for dross removal and surface leveling. But I can't seem to find anyone who has hands on experience with one.

Scratch mentioned his disappointing results, but there doesn't seem to be much on the web about it. It sure would be nice to feed a bunch of parts through one like patties in a Burger King.

On the back of my parts where the dross is, I am not as concerned about the crispness of the edges. So a wire cup and a hit with a belt or DA sander will do. But I really like a good flat surface on the 'face side' of a piece.

Using the wire cup, you'll find that the metal will roll up from a cut - depending on the direction of the brushing - leaving a lip that plays hell with the powder coating (or paint). Picture framing or edge pull is what I want to avoid. Having a nice square cut is my goal, avoiding the rounded-over edges from the brushing or the gouging from a disk.

But before investing a grand$ in a drum sander, I need to know if it will work for metal and how small a part it will handle without spitting the piece out the end. :lol:

Any help would be appreciated.
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Scratch
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Re: workholding table

Post by Scratch » Sat Mar 12, 2011 12:08 am

Must have me confused with someone else Dano... I've never tried a drum sander. I use a tumbler for all my small parts. Just an old cement mixer someone gave me.

For the larger parts, I use what I like to call "THE WIRE WHEEL OF PAIN" to remove the dross. I try to drop it on the table a few times first and the rest comes off easily enough that I haven't found the need for any type of hold down, although I've looked at those cool clamps you guys are talking about and will probably get a bunch and outfit my table with them. I can see using them alot if I had them.
I think I'm the oldest 10 year old boy on the forum...

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Re: workholding table

Post by WSS » Sat Mar 12, 2011 12:14 am

What is a drum sander and why does it cost so much?

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Re: workholding table

Post by AnotherDano » Sat Mar 12, 2011 12:35 am

WSS wrote:What is a drum sander and why does it cost so much?

http://www.amazon.com/DELTA-31-260X-18- ... B0017SRK7U
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Re: workholding table

Post by WSS » Sat Mar 12, 2011 1:40 am

AnotherDano wrote:
WSS wrote:What is a drum sander and why does it cost so much?

http://www.amazon.com/DELTA-31-260X-18- ... B0017SRK7U
Looks like fun! I would imagine a belt or drum would wear out pretty quick if a hard ridge ran through it. At least it would wear in one spot real quick. Bonded abrasives do not do too well with sharp edges. A hard wheel might work better like on a surface grinder. I do not do much gauge plate, mostly 1/2'and up. I do notice though on gauge plate the dross is harder and finer. Like hi-speed dross. I always attributed it to my lack of experience with it. With the thick stuff a burger flipper/scraper or clacking them together works good. With the thin stuff, I usually spend the time to flex wheel grind them. I do notice it seems like a lot of grinding.

I wonder if home depot rents these? I rented a floor drum sander from them once and seem to remember some other specialized drum abrasive machines. I will check my local home depot this weekend.

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Re: workholding table

Post by hinesigns » Sat Mar 12, 2011 6:04 pm

Back about 18 years ago, before the sign business,I waxed & sharpened skis.
I bought an 8" wet belt sander.It weighs about 150 lb & is 42" to the top of the belt. It has a platen plate in the middle & a crown wheel at each end.The belt is 8" x 42".
There is a submerciable pump down in the resivoir that feeds a 1/4" tube with about 20 pinholes in it. This water keeps the belt from getting hot.Believe you,me I don't through much out. It sat in storage in the back building until las year.
I put a strainer on the return to the resevoir to catch the metal fragments.
It is called an alstone ski tuner. Dont know if they still make them.

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Re: workholding table

Post by Oldsarge » Sat Mar 12, 2011 6:33 pm

Actually, that sander is mostly aimed at the woodworking crowd... don't know that the abrasives would do much good for metal longevity-wise... the wood is sandwiched between a drive roller belt, and the abrasives... the dross and intricate detail on a lot of patterns would tear the belt to shreds, and possibly damage the drum, the drive belt, and the project! :o

As a side note, I've thought about the possibility of building a stroke sander using the proper abrasives for metal... you can get really detailed and specific sanding with one....

Something like this... but smaller to fit what I plan to be doing...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n80QoYko ... 1871AAA82B


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Re: workholding table

Post by steelfx » Sat Mar 12, 2011 8:48 pm

this is what the "big boys" use...it's called a TimeSaver? & is designed specifically for gauge steel. Too expensive for my shop, but you can pick 'em up used fairly cheap. Pretty sure they require 3ph. 220V, though.
timesaver.jpg

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Re: workholding table

Post by steelfx » Sat Mar 12, 2011 8:53 pm

p.s.

I take off 99.99% of my dross with an acid-bath, water rinse & 175psi Shop Air.

I've tried all the ways mentioned above, and a few more to boot.

For my pieces, they all go in the acid tank & I never have to resort to wire cups, grinder wheels, abrasives,
chipping hammers, needle-scalers, etc.

The acid-bath also removes 100% of the Mill-Scale, if you're using H.R. Steel. It's like killing two birds with one stone!

:)

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Re: workholding table

Post by cncer » Sat Mar 12, 2011 9:04 pm

what is in the acid bath? i use flap wheels and wire cup brishes and sometimes its very time consuming.

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Re: workholding table

Post by srp » Sun Mar 13, 2011 5:05 pm

Some of us have to use what we have. With this device if you can use your imagination and see in your mind the picture of an older person saying to the police officer " I thought I had my foot on the brake." as their car is removed from the store wall. Same thing can happen with this contraption. When the beast starts to bite - Remove Your Foot From The Accelerator! This point is when the Mil. Spec. duct tape becomes important.

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