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Saw blade Designs Copyright

Posted: Wed May 16, 2018 2:34 pm
by 1eyedjim
Hello

Had a few customers requesting I sell a saw blade design with a man and son fishing scene with the text DAD at the bottom. I'm assuming fathers day? Anyway looking around on the usual places I can see a few sellers selling these. It's got me thinking. If I sold a saw blade design with a DIFFERENT scene in would this be ok? or would I be stepping on the sellers toes and getting some bad rep? Basically is the saw blade border idea copyrighted?

Thanks

Re: Saw blade Designs Copyright

Posted: Wed May 16, 2018 4:30 pm
by jason.jason.p
Judging by the many files shared on this and other sites like this with saw blade borders/ as well as the many that I have purchased from various providers of dxf art I'm going to have to guess no.

search.php?st=0&sk=t&sd=d&sr=posts&keywords=sawblade&fid%5B%5D=6&start=75

Re: Saw blade Designs Copyright

Posted: Wed May 16, 2018 5:12 pm
by Larry83301
1eyedjim wrote:Hello

Had a few customers requesting I sell a saw blade design with a man and son fishing scene with the text DAD at the bottom. I'm assuming fathers day? Anyway looking around on the usual places I can see a few sellers selling these. It's got me thinking. If I sold a saw blade design with a DIFFERENT scene in would this be ok? or would I be stepping on the sellers toes and getting some bad rep? Basically is the saw blade border idea copyrighted?

Thanks


I would say that the copyright has run out by now! :D
The use of a large circular saw in a saw mill is said to have been invented in 1813 by Tabitha Babbitt, a Shaker inventor, after she noted the inefficiency of the traditional saw pits used by the sawyers in her community and sought an improvement.

Larry

Re: Saw blade Designs Copyright

Posted: Wed May 16, 2018 5:26 pm
by rdj357
Any general concept is nearly unenforceable. When an artist draws something from scratch it is automatically 'copywritten' but they can go through the additional steps of filing for a registered copyright.

Any copyright has to rise to a level of originality. That is, just because you decide to put some art onto a shape does not mean that you can copyright the whole thing and prevent anyone else from putting art onto that shape. Sometimes even copyrights are registered for things that really probably don't rise to that level and the copyright owner is the one responsible for paying to defend their copyright. For instance, the state shapes with roots attached is copywritten by a shirt company. I doubt they'd win in court if it were challenged but it's their registered copyright nonetheless. Just depends on whose pockets are deepest for attorney fees.